Grammar Rules: How to Apply Parallelism

IELTS online course coaches, with their English know-how and insider knowledge of the high-stakes exam, often tell their students to cite examples when validating their key points – be it in a verbal or written discourse.

 

Listing down examples is not only the easiest approach to backing your statements; it is also the most convenient. Presenting models saves you the trouble of giving vivid descriptions and explanations as they are often self-explanatory. However, when using this commentary method, make sure that you do not get complacent with your grammar and structure applications.

 

Instructors of the best IELTS online review courses will tell you to pay attention to your sentence structures – especially when referring to multiple things or listing down ideas. A common mistake that most test takers commit is the disregard of proper parallelism.

 

How to Apply Parallelism

 

What is Parallelism? 

 

Parallelism or Parallel Structure occurs when two or more consecutive clauses or phrases possess identical grammatical structure. Here is an example:

 

As instructors of the best IELTS online review courses in the country, they conduct comprehensive lectures about the test coverage, facilitate in-depth discussions regarding the exam components, and provide effective strategies on the best ways to deal with assessment’s critical points.

 

Notice how each phrase starts with a verb? Parallel structure presents lists and passages in a more organized and easy-to-understand manner.

 

The Different Forms of Parallelism

 

Parallelism follows a pattern not only to implement a sense of order and cohesion but also to give each component – be it a series of words, clauses, and phrases – equal attention. Consider the forms and examples below during your IELTS online course sessions to learn the right and wrong ways to apply the parallel structure.

 

  1. Parallelism and Infinitive Phrases
    Use the word “to” before the first verb in the sentence or before all the verbs in the statement.
    RIGHT: He likes to skate, travel, and play video games.
    RIGHT: He likes to skate, to travel, and to play video games.
    WRONG: He likes skate, travel, and playing video games.

 

  1. Parallelism and Gerunds (-ing)
    RIGHT: He likes skating, traveling, and playing video games.
    WRONG: He likes skating, traveling, and to play video games.

 

  1. Parallelism and Verb Tenses 
    RIGHT: The coach told her to practice her routine more because she failed to keep her posture in the latter part of her performance, neglected some parts of her step sequence, and lacked her usual finesse.
    WRONG: The coach told her to practice her routine more because she failed to keep her posture in the latter part of her performance, neglected some parts of her step sequence, and she did not have her usual grace.

 

  1. Parallelism and Adverbs (-ly)
    RIGHT: The detective went through the case files quickly, thoroughly, and discreetly.
    WRONG: The detective went through the case files quickly, thoroughly, and in a hushed manner.

 

  1. Parallelism and Clauses
    RIGHT: The teacher told her students that they should complete their research by Wednesday, that they should submit their project proposals by Thursday, and that they should give weekly updates after.
    WRONG: The teacher told her students that they should complete their research by Wednesday, that they should submit their project proposals by Thursday, and to give weekly updates after.

 

  1. Parallelism and the Colon
    RIGHT: A line-less planner can be used to: keep track of your commitments, organize your class or work notes, and channel your creativity.
    WRONG: A line-less planner can be used to: keep track of your commitments, organize your class or work notes, and channeling your creativity.

 

Whenever you use parallelism in your statements – be it in an oral discourse or a written correspondence – always adhere to your established pattern. Compare each component to guarantee their consistency. Enroll in an IELTS online course to learn more about the parallel structure.

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